Breaking News
Home - Information - 20 Rarest Animals in the World

20 Rarest Animals in the World

Animals and Plants are an important part of nature. They are the beauty of the world. But in last few years, we have made life worse for them. Due to our mistakes, many plant and animal species vanish from the plant. Here will talk about species of animals which are moving to decline. They are in danger due to many reasons such as Hunting, removing of forests, cultivation, smuggling, pesticide poisoning and more. We have to take some steps to save our nature. Most of these animals are listed as critically engaged according to International Union of Preservation of nature.

20
Northern Bald Ibis
Northern Bald Ibis

Northern Bald Ibis or waldrapp is a migratory bird present in barren, semi-desert or rocky habitats. They vanished from Europe over 300 years ago. They are glossy black birds, 70-80 cm long with a 125 to 135 cm wingspan and an average weight of 1.0 to 1.3 kg. The head and face are dull red and unfeathered, and the curved bill and the legs are red. The longer-billed males are more successful in attracting a female Waldrapps. It breeds in loosely spaced colonies, nesting on cliff lodges. They start breeding at the age of three to five years. The Northern Bald Ibis has an average age of 20 to 25 years in captivity. 98% of Northern Bald Ibis population was declined between 1900 and 2002 due to many factors such as hunting, dam construction, disturbance, pesticide poisoning, and cultivation.

19
Hainan Gibbon
Hainan Gibbon

The Hainan Gibbon or Hainan Black Crested Gibbon is a species of gibbon found only in Hainan, China. Its habitat comprises semideciduous monsoon forests and broad-leaved forests. IUCN has identified Hainan Gibbon as critically endangered and it is present in the red list of IUCN. More than 25% of the Hainan Gibbon’s habitat has been removed due to pulp paper plantation growers. The male species are completely black, with white or buff cheeks sometimes. Female species have golden or buff color with black patches. Males and females both are slender, with long legs and arms and no tail. They use arms to swing from tree to tree. They sing duets for bonding and mating. Mostly they feed ripe, sugar rich fruits such as figs, leaves, and insects.

18
Sumatran Rhino
Sumatran Rhino

Sumatran Rhino is a rare member of the family Rhinocerotidae. It is the smallest species of Rhino, but still a large mammal. Head and body length of Sumatran Rhino is 2.36 to 3.18 m, and the height is between 112 and 145 cm. The tail is 35 cm to 70 cm long. The average weight of Sumatran Rhino ranges from 500 to 1,000 kg. There is only a single Sumatran Rhino on record with a weight of 2,000 kg. This species has two horns, the larger is the nasal horn, while the other horn is a stub. Most of the Sumatran Rhino’s body is covered with a coat of reddish-brown. They are habitants of swamps, rainforests, and cloud forests, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, China, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Thailand. The estimated population of Sumatran Rhino is 100 individuals. They are solitary creatures except for pairing before mating. They mostly eat leaves, shoots, and twigs.

17
Gooty Tarantula
Gooty Tarantula

Gooty Tarantula is a species of tarantula. This species shows an intricate fractal-like pattern on the abdomen. The natural habitat of Gooty Tarantula is a deciduous forest in Andhra Pradesh, in Central Southern India. It also has common names such as Poecilotheria Metallica, Gooty Saphire, Salepurgu, Peacock Tarantula, and Metallic Tarantula. It is only present in a small area of less than 100 square km. It lives in holes of tall trees where it makes asymmetric funnel webs. Its primary prey comprises different flying insects, which it seize in flight and paralyze. They may live communally when territory. It has a high price in the black market. The price of an adult Gooty Tarantula is above $500 in the United States. Females live for about 12 years, which is 3 to 4 times longer than males, making them highly expensive. Females are more useful for breeding, making demand higher. Habitat degradation and firewood harvesting are the main threats to Gooty Tarantula.

16
Durrell’s Vontsira
Durrell’s Vontsira

Salanoia Durrell, also known as Durrell’s Vontsira, is a Madagascan mammal in the family Eupleridae. Durrell’s Vontsira is only present in the Lac Alaotra; wich is an extremely threatened area. It is closely related to the brown-tailed mongoose. Durrell’s Vontsira is reddish-brown overall, paler than the mangoose. The nape and head are speckled. The underparts are reddish buff, and most of the tail is similar in color to the body, however, the tips yellowish-brown. The head and body length of female species are 310 mm, and the tail length is 210 mm. For a male species, the head and body length is about 330 mm, and the tail length is about 175 mm. They feed on prey with hard parts such as molluscs and crustaceans, in addition to small vertebrates. The pollution, overfishing, the construction of rice fields, and introduced species including plants, exotic fish, and the black rat are primary reasons of threats to Durrell’s Vontsira.

15
Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkey
Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkey

Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkey or Dollman’s Snub-Nosed Monkey is a slender-bodied arboreal Old World Monkey, the habitat of Northern Vietnam. It is a white and black monkey with blue patches around the eyes as well as has a pink nose and lips. Habitat loss and hunting are the primary threats for Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkeys. IUCN has rated this monkey species as “critically endangered.” The head and body length is 51 to 65 cm and its tail 66 to 92 cm. Males weigh about 14 kg while female weigh 8 kg. This species is diurnal, and its diet comprises a range of leaves, seeds, fruits, and flowers. They travel in small groups. The approximate population of Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkeys was 250 individuals in 2008. Mostly they are found in Tuyen Quang Province of Vietnam. Now, they’re less than 200 Tonkin Snub-Nosed Monkeys left in the wild.

14
Tiger Quoll
Tiger Quoll

Tiger Quoll is a carnivorous marsupial of the quoll genus Dasyurus native to Australia. It is also known as the spotted quoll, the spotted-tail quoll, the spotted-tailed dasyure or the tiger cat. Tiger Quoll is the world’s longest living carnivorous marsupial. This species is living in the wet forests of Tasmania, Southeaster Australia, and Northern Queensland. Males and females have an average weight of 3.5 and 1.8 kg respectively. It has short legs. However, the tail is equal to its body and head combined. Tiger Quoll has a thick neck and head and a slightly elongated and rounded snout. There are two species of Tiger Quoll, D.M. Maculatus, and D.M. Gracilis. The average length of first species is 930 mm for males and 811 for females for 2nd species, the average length of males and females, is 801 and 742. They are rare in southeastern Queensland and primarily restricted to national parks. Their population has been declined by 50%, in Victoria. They eat crayfish, insects, snakes, lizards, rabbits, and small mammals.

13
Angonoka Tortoise
Angonoka Tortoise

Angonoka Tortoise is also known as the Ploughshare tortoise, Madagascar angulate tortoise or Madagascar tortoise. It is a rare species of tortoise endemic to Madagascar. The outer parts of the vertebral have a dark brown color. The carapace is light brown in color with leading growth rings on each scute. Males are larger than females, with a carapace length up to 43 cm. The average weight of male Angonoka Tortoise is 10.3 kg and weight of a female is 8.8 kg on average. This species is only present in Madagascar. The estimated population of Angonoka Tortoise is about 600 individuals in the wild, however, is still decreasing. It will become extinct in the next 10 to 15 years. They feed grasses found in open rocky areas of bamboo scrub. Angonoka Tortoise became sexually mature at the age of 15 years. People capture Angonoka Tortoise to sell them in the International pet trade. They have a high price in the black market. It is the most endangered tortoise species in the world.

12
Chital
Chital

Chital, also known as Axis deer or spotted deer, is a deer found in the Indian Subcontinent. A male Chital reaches approximately 90 centimeters and females 70 centimeters at the shoulder. Male Chita’s weigh 30 to 75 kg, the lighter females weigh 25 to 45 kg. The males are larger than females, and only males have antlers. The upper parts of Chital are golden to rufous, covered in white spots. The throat, abdomen, ears, inside of legs, throat, and tail are all white. The chital has a more cursorial build as compared to the hog deer. The brow tines and antlers are longer than in the hog deer. In the summer time, they spend most of the daytime in summer and avoid sun’s glare. A relationship has been observed between herds of spotted deer and troops of the northern plains gray langurs. They primarily feed on grasses throughout the year. Mostly, they are found in India, Bhutan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.

11
Javan Rhino
Javan Rhino

The Javan Rhino is a very rare member of the family Rhinocerotidae. Only adult males have horns, and their horns are usually shorter than 25 cm. Javan Rhino is possibly the rarest large mammal on Earth, with a population between 58 and 61 in Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia. The second population was confirmed in Cat Tien National Park in Vietnam. Their horns have high value in traditional Chinese medicine, so people hunt them to get their horns. They have the cost of US$30,000 per kg on the black market.  That’s is the primary reason for their decline. The Vietnam War, in Southeast Asia, also has a contribution to the species’ decline. They are now present in the nationally protected area. However, Javan Rhinos are still at risk from disease, poachers, and loss of genetic diversity leading to inbreeding depression. They can live around 30 to 45 years in the wild. It is smaller than the Indian Rhino and is close in size to the black rhinoceros. The body length can be up to 2 to 4 m, and it can reach a height of 1.4 to 1.7 m. The adults have a weight between 900 and 2300 kg.

10
Giant Squid
Giant Squid

Giant Squid is a deep-ocean dwelling squid from the family Architeuthidae. Japanese researchers captured the first video of a live giant in its natural habitat in 2004. A Giant Squid has two longer tentacles, a mantle, and eight arms. The tentacles and arms account for much of the squad’s great length. Maximum weight for females is estimated at 275 kg and for males 150kg.  Maximum total length for a female is 13 m and for a male is 10m. Mostly they feed on deep sea fish and other squid species. They capture prey with two tentacles, gripping it with serrated sucker rings on the ends. They are solitary hunters because only individual squid have been captured in fishing nets. They are living in all of the world’s oceans. Mostly they are found near continental and island slopes from the North Atlantic Ocean. Giant Squids are rare in polar and tropical latitudes.

9
Warty Pig
Warty Pig

Warty Pig is a critically endangered species in the pig genus. Footage shortage, habitat loss, and hunting are the major causes of the Warty Pig’s status as critically endangered. The World know little about their characteristics or behavior due to the small number of remaining Warty Pig in the wild. Filipino natives captured them and used them for food and their skin for fur. They tend to live in groups of four to six. The diet of the pig primary comprises tubers, roots, and fruits. They mostly eat cultivated crops. 95% of their natural habitat has been cleared by farmers who cut down trees to plant crops. They are mostly seen during the dry season between the months of January and March.

8
White Lion
White Lion

White Lions are found in some wildlife reserves in South Africa and different zoos around the world. They are a genetic rarity of Panthera leo.  It was believed that they could not survive in the wild. That’s why a large part of the population of White Lions resides in zoos. Their color varies from blonde to near-white. White Lions have pigment visible in the eyes, paw pads, and lips. This animal is native to the Timbavati region of Africa and never seen in the wild since 1994.

7
Boni Giant Sengi
Boni Giant Sengi

Boni Giant Sengi is also popular as Jumping shrews or Elephant shrews. They are small insectivorous mammals which belong to the family Macroscellididae. Their traditional name Elephant shrews come from a fancied resemblance between their noses and the trunk of an elephant and a relationship with the shrews. They are living in the southern part of Africa. The Boni Giant Sengi is one of the fastest small mammals and has record speed of 28.8km/h. They are small, insectivorous, quadrupedal mammals resembling opossums or rodents, with elongated snouts, scaly tails, and long legs for their size, which are helpful for moving like rabbits. Their size changes from 10 cm to 30 cm and have a weight between 50 g and 500 g. The lifespans of Elephant shrew is two and a half to four years in the wild. They mainly eat invertebrates, such as earthworms, insects, spiders, millipedas, and centipedas. They use their long nose to find prey.

6
Florida Panther
Florida Panther

Florida Panther is an endangered subspecies of cougar that lives in swamps and forests of southern Florida, United States. This subspecies is also known as mountain lion, cougar, catamount, and puma. They are usually found in hardwood hammocks, pinelands, and mix swamps forests. They are spotted at birth and have blue eyes. They don’t have the ability to roar. However, they can make distinct sounds such as growls, whistles, hisses, chirps, and purrs. They are smaller than cougars from Southern and Northern climes but larger than cougars from the neotropics. The large male Florida Panthers weigh between 45.5 kg and 72 kg, whereas adult females weigh 29-45.5 kg. Shoulder height is 60 to 70 cm, and total length ranges from 1.8 to 2.2 m. Male Panthers are 9.4% longer and 33.2% heavier than females. Their diet comprises small animals such as mice, hares, and waterfowl, however, they also kill larger animals including white-tailed deer, storks, wild boar, and the American Alligator.

5
Snow Leopard
Snow Leopard
The Snow Leopard or Ounce is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of South and Central Asia. According to 2016 research, the estimated global population of Snow Leopard varies from 4080 to about 8,700 individuals. It inhabits alpine and subalpine zones at elevations from 3000 to 4500 m. Snow Leopards are smaller than the other big cats. Their weight ranges between 27 and 55 kg. They have a shorter body, with the length of 75 to 150 cm from the head to the base of the tail. They have thick, long fur, and their base color changes from smoky gray to yellowish tan, with whitish underparts. Their eyes are gray or pale green. They show many adaptations for living in a cold environment. Their ears are rounded and small, thick fur and stocky bodies, which helps them to minimize the heat loss. Their tails are long and flexible, which helps them to maintain their balance. Snow Leopards can kill animals two to four times their weight including the Markhor, Bharal, Himalayan Tahr, Camel, Horse, and Argali.
4
Angel Shark
Angel Shark

Angel Shark belongs to the Squatinidae family, which have flattened bodies and broad pectoral fins unusually. They occur worldwide in tropical and temperate seas. Angel Shark is sometimes known as monkfish. However, members of the genus Lophius also have the same name. The forward part of the angel shark’s body is flattened and broad; the red part has more typical muscular appearance than other sharks. The spiracles and eyes are on the top and the five gill slits on the back. Both the pelvic fins and pectorals are large and held horizontally. They have extensible jaws that can snap upwards rapidly to capture prey and comprises long needle-like teeth. Angel Shark buries itself in mud or sand lying in wait for prey including crustaceans, fish, and different types of mollusks. It is a bottom-dweller and appears harmless. Due to its sharp teeth and powerful jaws, Angel Shark can inflict painful lacerations if provoked.

3
Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth
Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth

The Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth is also popular as the dwarf sloth or monk sloth. It is a tree living sloth and feeds on leaves. The Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth is smaller than the other member of its genus. The head and body length of this sloth is between 19 and 21 inches and have body mass between 2.5 kg to 3.5 kg. It is a unique sloth because it is found in the red mangroves of Isla Escudos de Veraguas exclusively. This land is the small area of approximately 4.3 square kilometers. The estimated population of Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth was 79 in 2012. This animal spends 15 to 20 hours per day on tree and moves at the slow speed of 0.24 kilometers per hour. So it is one of the slowest animals. Pygmy Three-Toed Sloth feeds on red mangrove leaves which have poor nutrients and coarser. Their smaller size reduces their energy requirements for reproduction and survival, so they are an apparent example of insular dwarfism.

2
Red-Crested Tree Rat
Red-Crested Tree Rat

Red-Crested Tree Rat belongs to the family Echimydae and is the only member of Santamartamys genus. They have weight up to 500 grams and have a height of 51 to 122 cm. The body of tree rat is covered by the intense red hair, and a large portion of the tail hair is black. It comprises a large, heavy and uncurved zygomatic bone. It can easily climb a vertical wooden surface, and its diet is unknown, may be seeds or fruits. The scientists have believed that the family of Red-Crested Tree Rat is suffering degradation. This family is affected by climate change, feral cats, and the clearing of forest in its potential range of coastal Colombia.

1
Northern hairy-nosed wombat
Northern hairy-nosed wombat
The Northern hairy-nosed wombat belongs to the species of wombats. It is one of the rarest mammals in the world. The total population of Northern wombat comprises 113 individuals having only 30 breeding females, according to 2003 research. However, its population is increasing slowing and is equal to approximately 230 individuals in 2015. Generally, all species of wombat have large heads and powerful, short legs. They have powerful claws to dig their burrows. An individual takes a day to dig a burrow. Northern hairy-nosed wombats have bodies covered with soft, gray fur and a trait that distinguished them from the common wombat. Individuals have weight up to 40 kg and can be 35 cm high, up to 1m long. The Northern hairy-nosed wombat’s nose is important for survival because it contains very poor eyesight. These species can live without food for many days.

About Aaric

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *